Love Your Enemies

Homily preached by the Rev. James La Macchia
Trinity Parish of Newton Centre
February 19, 2017
The Seventh Sunday after Epiphany – Year A

Leviticus 19: 1-2, 9-18
Psalm 119: 33-44
1 Corinthians 3: 10-11, 16-23
Matthew 5: 38-48

My Friends:

mlkOf the many so-called hard sayings of Jesus, his commands in this morning’s reading from the Gospel according to Saint Matthew may well be the hardest of all.  It is challenge enough to love and to forgive your neighbor or your kin; it’s quite another matter to “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven.”  Jesus’ clear admonition has perplexed and challenged the individual Christian conscience for millennia, and it has vexed nations and empires since the beginning of the Christian era.  Is it a categorical mandate for pacifism, or just a caution to individuals and nations contemplating the use of violence and war as “an extension of politics by other means,” to use the apt and famous phrase of Karl von Clausewitz? God knows that we have witnessed both aplenty during the blood-soaked twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ranging from Gandhi’s non-violent movement to drive the British Raj from India, followed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s struggle for American civil rights in the 1960s; to World War l, that so-called war to end all wars, and its extension known as World War ll—the “good war” fought by “the greatest generation.”  And what about the horror of the Shoah, and the train of genocides during the second half of the twentieth century in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, and Darfur in the wake of that “good” war? Should the international community have decisively invoked its “obligation to protect” and have used effective military force to end the carnage in those places?  And what should the United Nations Security Council do right now about the ISIS genocide of Christians, Yazidis, and Shi’a Muslims in areas under its control, together with the war crimes and crimes against humanity perpetrated every day for nearly six years in Syria, together with the genocide about to break out in South Sudan?  Try as we may, we cannot and, as Christians, we may not duck these difficult moral dilemmas with a quick reference to Jesus’ words in this morning’s Gospel.  Our time and place in human history demand answers and urgent action, not soothing evasions, for in a world awash in nuclear weapons, and in the midst of the greatest migration and refugee crisis since World War ll, even inaction is a moral decision demanding a moral reckoning. Continue reading

The Weakness of God

panagia2bglikofilousa2beditedOverwhelmed by omnipotence, we miss the heart of love. How can I matter to him? We say. It makes no sense; he has the world, and even that he does not need. It is folly even to imagine him like myself, to credit him with eyes into which I could ever look, a heart that could ever beat for my sorrows or joys, a hand he could hold out to me. For even if the childish picture be allowed, that hand must be cupped to hold the universe, and I am a speck of dust on the star-dust of the world.

Yet Mary holds her finger out, and a divine hand closes on it. The maker of the world is born a begging child; he begs for milk, and does not know that it is milk for which he begs. We will not lift our hands to pull the love of God down to us, but he lifts his hands to pull human compassion down upon his cradle. So the weakness of God proves stronger than men, and the folly of God proves wiser than men. Love is the strongest instrument of omnipotence, for accomplishing those tasks he cares most dearly to perform; and this is how he brings his love to bear on human pride; by weakness not by strength, by need and not by bounty.

— From Said or Sung by Austin Farrer (1904-1968)

 

Safety in Danger

Homily for Sunday, December 11, 2018
Advent 3
Isaiah 35:1-10


romantic-couple-illustrationIf Jonah Lehrer’s new book, A Book About Love, is any indication, true love is less about roses and romantic dinners and gazing into another’s eyes than it is about getting the chores done, showing up when you said you would, and learning to set aside your wants and finding pleasure in your partner’s wants.   In the end, steadiness is what will carry the day, says Lehrer, keeping a relationship vital and bringing joy and satisfaction.

At first glance, Lehrer’s premise may sound good.  But New York Times columnist David Brooks disagrees.  In his review of Lehrer’s book, Brooks writes: “It could be the truth is actually just the opposite,” that “crazy” love rather than “steady” love will, in the end, carry the day. Continue reading

Called to be Saints

Homily for Sunday, November 6, 2016
All Saints’ Day

This morning I am going to preach two homilies – don’t worry, both short.  On this All Saints’ Day I want to say something about saints, how we are all called to be saints.  And then I want to say something about our country’s forthcoming election.

idl

First, about saints.  In September I attended a panel discussion at Boston College for the new movie, “Ignacio de Loyola:  Soldier, Sinner, Saint,” about Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits.  Taking part in the panel discussion were the lead actor who played Ignatius, Andreas Munoz, and also the associate director, Catherine Azanza.  Both Andreas and Catherine said some insightful things about saints. Continue reading

Healthy and Authentic Relationships

Homily for Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Wednesday in the 22nd Week after Pentecost
Luke 11:42-44

“You tithe mint and rue and herbs of all kinds,
and neglect justice and the love of God.”

mint-521401_960_720Today’s gospel text is a call to authentic relationship with Jesus Christ.   “Authentic” relationship with Jesus is not about rules and regulations – it’s not about tithing “mint and rue and herbs of all kinds” – but is about doing justice and loving God.  To be sure, there are rules and regulations in the Church, as there are in any institution, and we are called to follow them as best we may.  But it is important to keep in mind that the goal of these rules, the aim of our institution, is human health and wholeness, “justice and the love of God.” Continue reading

The Cost of Following Jesus

Sermon for Sunday, September 4, 2016
Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost
Luke 14:25-33

la_cathedral_mausoleum_jesus_and_the_childrenThe Pope obviously did not get the memo.  Just this past May the Pope published, “The Joy of Love,” an exhortation encouraging love in marriage and the family.  But in today’s gospel lesson Jesus said: “Whoever comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters… cannot be my disciple!”

Jesus does not of course mean that we are really to hate our family. What Jesus is doing in today’s gospel lesson is using exaggeration to get his listeners’ attention.  [Think of a politician on the campaign trail trying to get people’s attention.  Not to name names, but it seems that some will say just about anything to get people’s attention!]  But what Jesus says in today’s gospel not only gets people’s attention, but also helps introduce his message.

What I hear in today’s gospel lesson is an invitation from Jesus to follow.  Following him will be an adventure, Jesus suggests, and will not always be easy. Continue reading

Biblical Break Up Songs

Sermon for Sunday, July 17, 2016
Ninth Sunday after Pentecost
Amos 8:1-12

adele-2015-close-up-xl_columbia-billboard-650We heard several great readings this morning!  In Luke we heard the well-known story of Mary and Martha.  In Colossians we heard the famous hymn with its theologically–significant line:  “In him the fullness of God was pleased to dwell.”  But today I want to focus on the passage from Amos.

But I don’t want to begin with the passage from Amos.  Rather, I want to begin with Adele’s list of her favorite break-up songs, a list revealed last month.  There are six. Continue reading