All Human Hearts Seek God

Homily for Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Luke 7:18-23

“Are you the one who is to come, or are we to wait for another?”… “Go and tell John what you have seen and heard:  the blind receive their sight, the lame walk,
the lepers are cleansed, the dear hear, the dead are raised,
the poor have good news brought to them.”

areyoumymotherI have a hunch that the question John’s disciples put to Jesus is a question that we all ask: “Are you the one who is to come, or are we to wait for another?”  All human hearts seek God.  Like the newly-born baby bird who falls out of his nest in P.D. Eastman’s children’s classic,  Are you my mother?, and who runs around asking various things, “Are you my mother?”(the dog, the airplane, the steam shovel) so do all of us humans run around to different things to ask, “Are you the one who is to come?  Are you God?”

All human hearts seek God.  But only God is God (and not the steam shovel, or the plane or the dog).  And Jesus urges John’s disciples – he urges us! – to pay attention.  “Go and tell John what you have seen and heard.”  Pay attention!  Pay attention to what brings healing and wholeness; pay attention to what makes life more full and gives joy.  Continue reading

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Jesus in the Room and on the Road

Sermon for Sunday, April 19, 2015
Easter 3B
Luke 24:36b-48

This morning’s sermon is not about the Beatles.  This morning’s sermon is about the tension – the creative, dynamic tension – that exists between our interior, contemplative life and the Church’s active mission “to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.”  I am going to say how these two dynamics – contemplative and active – are not at all incompatible, but rather are two lungs through which healthy disciples breathe.

But I am going to begin with the Beatles, two of whose titles tell us about the writings of John and Luke.  “The Long and Winding Road” offers an image to help us better understand Luke.  “Come Together” (“right now, over me”) gives us an image to better understand John.  I’m preaching about these two authors because – as the keen-of-eye may notice –  with the exception of the epistle lesson on Easter Day, every one of our scripture lessons during the Easter season comes from either the author of John or Luke.  (Remember that the author of Luke is also the author of Acts.) Continue reading