Nurturing Vows

Homily for Saturday, September 30, 2017
Celebration of Marriage
Juan Angel Castañeda-Merced and Paul Steven Henry

California_Pinot_noirIn the 2004 movie Sideways, Mile and Maya (played by Paul Giamatti and Virginia Madsen are sharing a quiet moment and a glass of Pinot Noir.  Maya asks Miles:

So why are you so into Pinots?  They’re like a thing with you.

Miles reflects for a moment and then responds:

It’s a hard grape to grow, as you know. It’s thin-skinned, temperamental, ripens early.  It’s not a survivor like Cabernet that can grow anywhere and thrive even when it’s neglected.  Pinot needs constant care and attention, you know?  And in fact it can only grow in these really specific, little, tucked away corners of the world.  And, and only the most patient and nurturing of growers can do it, really. Only somebody who really takes the time to understand Pinot’s potential can then coax it into its fullest expression. Continue reading

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Playing the “Music” of Liturgy — Like Mendicant Monks…

Wanted to share this article by Todd here on the parish site as well. He wrote this in the Parish Newsletter, Fall 2011.

Witnessed the yearly piano recital of my two oldest today in the public hall of the Waltham Public Library. Hearing their lovely melodies and inspired playing reminded me of one of my boss’ best articles on the subject of music, inspiration, and worship. Enjoy! This past summer, my 10 year-old son made a significant breakthrough […]

via Playing the “Music” of Liturgy — Like Mendicant Monks…

Doubting Thomas

Homily for Sunday, April 23, 2017
Easter 2A
John 20:19-31
“Thomas answered him, ‘My Lord and my God.’”

doubting-thomas-duccioToday’s gospel lesson is the familiar story of “Doubting Thomas.”  (Each year the Second Sunday of Easter uses this lesson, from the end of John.)  As I said last Sunday, doubts are a normal and healthy part of faith.  A healthy place to be is in tension with, on the one hand, the Bible’s stories and Church’s teachings about Jesus’ resurrection, and on the other hand our own doubts and skepticism about the resurrection.  I compared navigating the tension between these to be akin to a ship navigating its way between rocks.  The temptation is, when still off in the distance, to jump ship, as it were – or to try to convince our inner “captain” to turn around or to maybe incite a “mutiny” – rather than sail forward and risk the “rocks” of resurrection.  But I noted that, if we sail forward and learn to navigate the “rocks,” we come to a place where we are not so much concerned about what “really” happened at Jesus’ resurrection, a place where we are not so much concerned either about what may be in our own future after we die, but a place rather in which we are focused on the “now.”  And in this Easter “now” we discover that we can live fearless of death.  Mot that we don’t fear death – I think the fear of death is normal, and I have a hunch that all healthy people have at least some fear of death – but a place in which we learn to live beyond our fears.  And I suggested that it is in this “now” that Mary Magdalene lived, she who was not afraid to be present at the crucifixion or the tomb, and who – as soon as Jesus said her name – was brought back into the “now” such that she could notice – and savor and relish – the presence of the risen Christ. Continue reading

Grief and Gratitude

Homily for Thursday, April 13, 2017
Maundy Thursday
John 13:1-17, 31b-35
Preached by the Rev. Todd Miller

1200_thomas_shawWhen our former Bishop, Tom Shaw, was diagnosed with the brain tumor that would take his life, he said that his first reaction to the news was gratitude:  “Thank you, God, for this extraordinary life that you’ve given me.”

Tom’s reaction to the news of his terminal condition reminds us that there is a very short distance between grief and gratitude.   Most of us most of the time, when we are faced with a loss, tend to take the long road between the grief and gratitude – the road of shock, anger, denial, depression, and bargaining – before arriving at acceptance and maybe gratitude.   But the distance between grief and gratitude is actually very close. Continue reading

Changing Season

(Offertory for the Sixth Sunday of Easter, 1 May 2016)

road-1072823_960_720Summer is passing, even as our climate here in Massachusetts clings to a pattern of dry yet humid weather that has dominated for much of the season.  The sun tells the tale without ambiguity: this morning it rose after 6:00, and it will be dark by the time my child is tucked into bed this evening.

Autumn leads us into times of harvest and work, thanksgiving and celebration, new endeavors and a new year in many traditions.  As we make our preparations, listen below for a memory of the preceding season in the church year, Easter.  The anthem is the second of Five Mystical Songs by Ralph Vaughan Williams (Trinity Parish’s choir returns for the eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost, 18 September).

Continue reading

Burial Sermon, James Spinks

Sermon for Tuesday, August 2, 2016
Burial, James Spinks
John 14:1-6

Picture 089I find Jesus’ words comforting:

Do not let your hearts be troubled… I go to prepare a place for you.  And if I go… I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be also.

To non-Christians – and maybe even to us Christians! – Jesus’ words might seem preposterous:  “When we’re dead, we’re dead!”  But our Christian faith is rooted in belief in resurrection.  As we began our liturgy this afternoon:

I know that my Redeemer lives, and that at the last he will stand upon the earth.  After my awaking, he will raise me up; and in my body I shall see God… Continue reading

Unquantifiable Fruit

fruit-treeBecause we do not always see these seeds growing, we need an interior certainty, a conviction that God is able to act in every situation, even amid apparent setbacks: “We have this treasure in earthen vessels” (2 Cor 4:7). This certainty is often called “a sense of mystery”. It involves knowing with certitude that all those who entrust themselves to God in love will bear good fruit (cf. Jn 15:5). This fruitfulness is often invisible, elusive and unquantifiable. Continue reading